After nearly two years of detailed negotiations, on March 25, 2022, U.S. President Joe Biden and European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen announced an “agreement in principle” on a new Trans-Atlantic Data Privacy Framework (the “Framework”) to re-establish an important legal mechanism to effectuate cross-border transfers of personal data from the EU to the U.S. The Framework is hoped to address concerns raised by the decision of the Court of Justice of the European Union (the “CJEU”) in Data Protection Commissioner v Facebook Ireland and Maximillian Schrems (2020) (“Schrems II”).
Continue Reading Schrems III? The European Commission and U.S. Government Announce New Trans-Atlantic Data Privacy Framework

On 10 November 2021, the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom handed down its much-awaited judgment in the case of Lloyd v Google LLC [2021] UKSC 50.  The Supreme Court unanimously ruled that the claim, which is a representative action alleging breaches of the Data Protection Act 1998 (“DPA 1998”), could not proceed.

The Supreme

The past few years have brought monumental changes to how we handle international data transfers from the EU. Schrems I, GDPR, Schrems II, Brexit and now the new Standard Contractual Clauses, published in June, 2021.

Here we share our views on improvements and challenges this modernised version of the SCCs has brought and how it

On 11 February 2021, the Abu Dhabi Global Market (“ADGM”), Abu Dhabi’s financial free zone, enacted the new Data Protection Regulations 2021 (the “Regulations”), replacing the Data Protection Regulations 2015 in their entirety and bringing the ADGM regime closer to the European Union’s data protection regime under the General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”).

Our alert memo, published at the end of 2020 following the ADGM’s opening of a public consultation period on the draft Data Protection Regulations 2020 (the “Draft Regulations”), provides an overview of the key features of the Draft Regulations, areas of overlap with the GDPR, as well as certain proposed departures from the GDPR that will need to be monitored by organisations doing business in both the ADGM and the European Union.

The Regulations are applicable to those processing personal data where a controller or processor has been established in the ADGM, regardless of whether the processing actually takes place in the ADGM or not.

We set out below an update to our alert memo, highlighting the few notable additions/amendments to the Draft Regulations as compared with the final Regulations published on 11 February 2021.

Continue Reading ADGM enacts new Data protection Regulations 2021

On October 4, 2018, the Financial Markets Law Committee (“FMLC”) published a paper on the subject of “Data Protection: Issues of Legal Uncertainty Arising from the UK Data Protection Act 2018.”  Cleary Gottlieb contributed to this paper as a participant in the FMLC’s data protection working group.

The FMLC’s paper focuses on issues of legal

The £16.4 million fine imposed by the UK Financial Conduct Authority on Tesco Personal Finance plc provides a salutary lesson on the regulatory exposure associated with failing adequately to prepare for and respond to a cyber-attack – one of the FCA’s stated regulatory priorities.

The episode illustrates how cybersecurity failures can expose a business not

On the heels of the European Union’s implementation of the General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) and public outcry over the Cambridge Analytica scandal, on June 28, 2018, California enacted the most comprehensive data privacy law to date in the United States. The California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (the “CCPA”) was hastily passed by the

The disclosure by Uber of a data breach that occurred in October 2016 has prompted a growing number of regulators to open investigations into the company.  According to Bloomberg, the breach (which Uber disclosed on November 21, 2017) involved hackers accessing the names, email addresses and phone numbers of 50 million riders and 7 million drivers and the driver’s license numbers of approximately 600,000 U.S. drivers.

Continue Reading EU and U.S. Regulators respond to the Uber breach

On October 18, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (the “CFPB”) released the Consumer Protection Principles: Consumer-Authorized Financial Data Sharing and Aggregation (the “Principles”).  The Principles represent a cautious step forward by the CFPB in providing guidance on how institutions holding customer accounts (such as banks) should share information with service providers, including “fintech” companies that obtain customer authorization to access their account information in order to provide services to such customers.  Such data aggregation-based service providers can provide useful products and services to consumers, such as fraud screening, identity verification, personal financial management and bill payment, and promote competition in the financial services market.  With respect to fraud screening and identity verification services in particular, in the aftermath of the recent Equifax breach, the appeal of such services is obvious.  However, with additional sharing of data comes additional risks—the increase in data access points, albeit consumer-authorized, presents new challenges from a cybersecurity and privacy perspective, increasing the possibility of consumers inadvertently losing control of their information.
Continue Reading CPFB Releases Consumer Protection Principles for Consumer-Authorized Financial Data Sharing and Aggregation

On October 18, 2017, the European Commission published its report on the functioning of the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield framework (the “Privacy Shield”), marking the conclusion of its first joint annual review of the regime.  The Privacy Shield, which is administered by the International Trade Administration within the U.S. Department of Commerce (“DOC”), provides companies on both sides of the Atlantic with a mechanism to comply with data protection requirements when transferring personal data from the European Union to the United States.  To join the Privacy Shield, a U.S.-based organization is required to self-certify to the DOC and publicly commit to comply with the Privacy Shield requirements.  While joining the Privacy Shield is voluntary, once an eligible organization makes the public commitment to comply with the Privacy Shield requirements, the commitment will become enforceable under U.S. law.
Continue Reading EU-U.S. Privacy Shield Functions Well, with Scope for Improvement, According to its First Annual Review